Posts Tagged ‘classic boat’

Marine Racing Duesenberg W-24 Engine

Horace Dodge, Jr. liked fast boats and Unlimited Class boat racing. He hired the Duesenberg Brothers Racing (Augie and Fred) in 1925 to design, build and deliver two of these W-24 marine engines. The W shape was made up from three double overhead camshaft straight 8 engines all going to a common crankshaft. There are the right, center and left banks of 8 cylinders to this engine.

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Mr. Dodge Horace Dodge Jr. (son of one of the Dodge Bros.) wanted this new boat racing engine for his racing activities. Besides racing he also was a production wooden boat builder (starting in 1923). His production boats were called Dodge Watercars. His first factory was in Detroit, MI. But, he is known for his Newport News, VA factory that he had built to his design specs and that opened in 1930. That business closed in 1936. Its building is now the home to the Mariner’s Museum.
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Two Duesenberg W-16 engines were delivered in the summer of 1926. However, the success of these engines came much later. That racing engine last win was with Dan Arena who drove one of his boat designs (Notre Dame) to First Place in the 1940 President’s Cup. Along the way, these engines had different owners, were installed in several racing boats by those engine owners, and had several famous racing engine experts work on them, various carburetor set-ups (both in number and throats of each carb), and supercharging. Starting out at around 450-475 Hp in the later 1920s, the final supercharged engine made 850 Hp at 5,000 RPM in 1940.

Engine specs for the W-24 Duesenberg were 623 cu. in. with a bore of 2.875 inches by a 4 inch stroke.

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First Niche Chris Craft

Words © Chris (seabuddy) Brown and photos CBMM
Chris Craft Corporation said this quote “Chris-Craft has the name, the prestige, the public acceptance. It has consistently advanced from the beginning and maintained the continued success for its merchants. Chris –Craft has been the leader, is the leader, and will continue to lead” in the early 1930s..
By 1936-1937 Chris Craft introduced what Seabuddy labels’ the first niche Chris Craft Runabout; the 19’ Special Race Boat. It had a cut down (lower) hull profile with less freeboard fore and aft. Plus, Chris-Craft boats used thinner dimension framing as well as thinner planking in the bottom for this 19’ Special Race Boat model. These changes made a big difference compared to their other 19’ by 6’2” sized runabouts that were made by Chris Craft boats for the masses. For instance, while there are different engine choices, it is perhaps fair to say that one of these boats were 20% faster.
Funny thing… Chris Craft made 51 of these boats, the same number of 19’ Chris Craft Cobras it made in 1955. So, this first niche Chris Craft Runabout is about a rare a boat as there is in the Chris Craft line-up ,just like a 19’ Cobra is! Note, they made some 760 plus units of this 19’ 0” by 6’ 2” hull in their standard models.
The Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the ACBS clubs St. Micheals Classic Boat Show had both of these rare boats, fully restored in its annual June event. They were displayed on the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum grounds over three days in 2015. It was a signature show! Seabuddy hopes that you made it to the show or plan on putting this show on your calendar in the future years.
Now, there is a new construction wood boat available for a custom new build with a period correct engine for the made-to-order newly built hull or a buyer can direct that a modern V-8 Seabuddy has seen this boat, it is a real head tuner. Please see… http://www.vintagewatercraft.com/classic_boat_construction.htm and scroll down on the left to the “1937 Special Runabout (19’)”.
It was only in 1930, that Chris – Craft Corporation was the boat building company’s new name that Christopher Columbus Smith started business back in about 1874. The name had changed many times to allow for various partners in the years between these dates. It (the name) was the family’s idea and a way to sell 1/3 of the company to Wall Street. That partial stock sale never happened. The family ran the company and kept it private until they sold the entire corporation in early 1960.

Cobra Chris Craft and Shelby Cobra 427 together at Classic Boat Show

Words © Chris Seabuddy Brown, photo by CBMM
A Chris Craft Cobra set to towed by a Carroll Shelby Cobra 427 at a Classic Boat Show. It was the winner of the Best of Show-Land Display at the Classic Boat Show. Only at a classic show would such icons of land and water, or keels and wheels, if you prefer would seabuddy see such a thing on a Saturday afternoon.
Boaters know the Cobra’s as the most collectible models of mid-fifties. Restored Cobra boats are the envy of most fans of the classic Chris Craft line-up. They were made in only one year and only in very limited quantities. These two models are rare Chris Crafts. They were style leader models, made to attract buyers to dealer boat showrooms and major boat shows of the Chris Craft models. These other roughly 150 boat models were each priced at a profit. Chris Craft was still privately owned by the descendants of Chris Smith (who had died in 1939 two weeks after being found in the Chris Craft boiler room bleeding from his nose) and many family members still worked in the business.
Chris Craft Cobras used gold finished fiberglass to fashion a big fin behind the seat that dominates the styling of both sizes of these boats. This was an early attempt by the world leader in wooden boat construction to use the new boat-building material. The fiberglass was made in one plant and the otherwise planked mahogany wood boat was made in another. Several fiberglass parts did not match up with their boat hulls when mated on the final production line, the trial and error of fitment was one of the first learning lessons.
The boats used some car parts like the steering columns and their steering wheels are said to be1949 Chrysler parts. Cars and their brand-leading styling like the Mercedes Gullwing, GM Corvette, and early Ford Thunderbirds with limited seating and more style than function are often mentioned with the Chris Craft Cobras. These models are runabouts. Get in, sit-down, and enjoy. One does not walk around in a runabout.
Now, for the other snake in this write-up.
The 289 Shelby Cobra had used the British AC Ace car that came to market in around 1953 which began with a 100 HP engine ant then later with up to 120 HP six cylinder engine. The first small block Shelby’s used Ford’s then new 260 cu. In. V-8 engines for 75 Cobras and then 289 cu. in. engines (about 525 cars). There were several changes in these cars over the production run including rack and pinion steering, inboard and outboard mounted disc brakes, wheel hubs, and various details like radiators.
The Shelby Cobra 427 was the big block Cobra that Carroll Shelby created. That car had a new chassis and coil springs (instead of the transverse leaf springs of the Ace and the Ford small block cars). That new frame and suspension were developed with Ford’s cooperation, (Klaus Arning and Bob Negstad at Ford and this suspension is similar to the Ford GT-40s) and it is best identified by the wide fenders and an even bigger radiator opening. The engine was both a 427 and a 428 Ford engines. The 427 was the more desirable “side-oiler” engine.
Both Cobras are show stoppers!

chris craft cobra shelby 427 cobra

rare Chris Craft Cobra ready to be towed by Shelby 427 Cobra

Classic Boat Show Award Winner #3

Words and photos © Chris (Seabuddy) Brown
The Judges Choice this year was a custom 1964 sport fisherman cabin cruiser. That is as they say… the boat that they personally want to go home with after the show has ended. She is a 36’ wood fish fighter that is the precursor which the modern sport fishers. This was the way one went after sailfish, tuna, and white and blue marlin for sport fishing fun. She has a flat bottomed transom (not a deep vee), no keel, and twin inboard shaft drives (no bullet to house the F-N-R gears of multiple outboard engines exposed in the wake of the hull, as the transmissions are inboard within the hull).
Her name is SAM V. She came up from Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Her owners are members of the Sunnyland Club of the ACBS as well as the Chesapeake Bay Chapter Club.
This 1964 yacht was built by the custom wood boat builder of Rybovich and Sons, of West Palm Beach, FL. as their hull number 58. First powered by twin gas engines, she has been re-powered years ago with twin Cummins diesels for a cruising speed of 23 MPH and a wide open throttle speed of 31 MPH.
Other features of this boat are her 1) Classic Rybovich broken sheer line. 2) “Palm Beach” throttles and shifts pod. 3) Open deckhouse aft “canvas wall” for free flow to/from the cockpit and the upper sheltered area (thus, she is a best called a “Day boat”, not a convertible or a sedan). From 1965 on, all Rybovich boats had an aft bulkhead.
She is like Miss Chevy IV, built in 1952 and not as close to mimicking Miss Chevy II, built in 1947.The 1952 Chevy IV has the broken sheer in the two boat photo.
Seabuddy brings these two boats into this discussion as these two boats set the pace for Rybovich sport fishers to come. Sam V has the early features / items and shares most of these key ingredients.

rybovich pod throttles shifts

custom Rybovich engine controls

rybovich bow

bow shot

dockside view rybovich sport fisherman

good side view

rybovich transom boat photo

transom photo wood sport fishing boat

side view wood boat

rybovich, custom wood boat,

Award winner presentation

Sunday Award Presentaion

Classic Boat Show Award Winner report #2

Words and photos © Chris (Seabuddy) Brown

 

Stephanie Rayan from VA. re-powered her Dorsett cuddy cabin model last winter and won three awards at the 2015 Classic Boat Show. Stephanie likes to use her boat, even as far away as cruising in FL waters. Thus, a modern engine made sense for her style of enjoyment of classic boating. Typical for her, she named her new motor. (her boat is named Sunburn)  The motor is called Neverude. This engine was also repainted to color coordinate it to the boat’s gelcoat.

 

Sunburn is an outboard-powered 1960 Catalina model.  The boat is perfectly restored. As an added plus, Stephanie displayed her entry in this popular classic boat show in-the-water-and-ready-to-go with great details like an “iced” drink cooler sporting the memorable “Coppertone girl and her dog”,  along with games, and functional items like a spotlight. The boat was a show-stopper that brought smiles and sparked conversations among many show-goers as they walked the docks of this 17-acre show.

 

Sunburn is now re-powered by a new outboard. This provides good power for the 16’ 8” LOA Catalina model Dorsett. The boat is finished in Pennant Red, one of the five colors that were offered in 1960 by the boat builder. This classic small cruiser boat sleeps two down below, out of the weather. Raymond Loewy, noted designer of a few early 50’s Studebakers as well as the Avanti cars developed the design for this and other boats for the Dorsett Plastic Corporation. Loewy used a 6’ 6-1 /2” wide beam for the 17’ model.

 

This fiberglass boat company started making boats in 1955, first calling them Endura Craft boats. By 1958, the all the boats were marketed as Dorsett Boats. In 1960 the company was sold to Textron, Inc., which kept the Dorsett name. By then they were selling about $3,000,000 in boats, which were made in three boat-building plants, located in nearby Cambridge, MD as well as in California and Indiana. In 1964 and then in 1968 the company was sold again. The Dorsett Boat name ended in the 1967-1968 timeframe.

 

Sunburn, Neverrude and her skipper were a hit at the show.

sunburn 1960 fiberglass boat

 

 

ACBS Classic Boat Show and Festival Award Winners #1

Words and photos © Chris (Seabuddy) Brown

A black hulled single engine Cigarette swept its classes first time out of the barn. While she was up against a fast Nova/ Allmand 19, the judges all agreed that Lotus was the clear winner. Everyone was pleased that the number of off-shore fiberglass boats in attendance was on the upswing at this year’s boat show. Each show of the 57 diferent clubs have a slant to their show. It looks like this Mid-Atlantic Father’s Day Classic Boat Show / Festival is beginning to get the go-fast in rough water boating crowd.

Lotus is not a race boat, just a high speed, wave splitter cruiser/day boat for a young married couple and their dog. The boat is re-powered with a replacement, updated big block 496 cu. in. Chevy engine with EFI, for the ease of starting and shifting. The newer engine takes away show award points, but the ease of use of the newer intake system makes for a better boat, day in/ day out.

What does not take away points is the black hull finish. This boat has over 1,200 hours of sanding to get that flawless finish, up from a production boat building level of finish. She was finish sanded to over 2,000# grit paper. It is a AWLGRIP finish that one sees now.

The deck, cockpit, and the wood trim also took lots of finish work. Basically, it is several layers of epoxy. The cockpit dash was also updated with new instruments and other details. However, the vinyl seats and trim are several years old. There is a longish vinyl pad under the foredeck. It is out of the weather and in a pinch, one could overnight in this limited cabin.

Figure on a 45 MPH cruise and about a 70 MPH top end as powered in this 1972 24’ classic GO-FAST cruiser re-do.

 

New twin engined wooden Runabout

34 twin engine speedboat runabout

new wooden boat

see inside wood boat
deck members in place
swim step built in wood boat
wood boat swim platform construction detail
twin engine speed boat
at speed on the lake
new construction wood boat hatch
this engine hatch knocks my socks off

 

She is a new wooden inboard speedboat. Hand crafted by one of the few boat yards that still do this “creation work” as compared to “restoration work”. Although the shop does both types of work. http://cdacustomwoodboats.com/process/ 

 

She was created under the personal direction of Jim Brown the wood shop manager and who is a master craftsman He has been building wood boats full time since 1991. He provides expertise in every phase of wood boat construction, from the creation and design of a project through the lofting, building, rigging and finish steps of the process. He has a team of wood craftsmen at The Resort Boat Shop to create the award-winning Coeur Custom line of boats and offer restoration for antique and classic boats. His e-mail address is jbrown@hagadonemarine.com

Seabuddy loves the engine hatch on this luxury speedster on the water. Twin 400 Horsepower rated engines are under there. It is a very unique way to access the powerplants. Jim also builds single engine boats and in different lengths. He has even crafted a sailboat or two.

Here is the boat builder’s comment on this 34’ inboard runabout “Pure is an example of the “pure” definition of Gentleman’s Runabout. She is hand-crafted from imported African mahogany and Western red cedar; cold molded using vacuum bag technology to produce excellent weight to strength ratios. This amazing 34’ runabout is powered by twin 6.2 liter small block engines that rate 400 HP each.  The purposeful design of the hull give her amazing lift, maximizing power and achieving a quick plane and smooth, powerful cruising stability.  The Alexseal Blue Hull sides add to her unique attractiveness while providing added durability.  A custom signature stainless steel windshield with special bent safety glass, Livorsi gauge package with custom dial faces give Pure a distinctive look no other boat possesses.

Pure is, from stem to stern, one of the most sturdily built, luxuriously fitted and handsomely powered hand-crafted wooden runabouts we’ve ever created”.

 

 

 

Wooden Runabout by John L. Hacker

wooden inboard runabout john hacker new york thousand islands

48' Worlds' Largest Runabout "Pardon Me" at the Antique Boat Museum

 

She is big! 48’ long with a beam of 10’ 6” and sixteen tons in weight. Power is a single screw Packard 4M-2500 engine, a supercharged 12-cylinder engine. This runabout speedboat’s top speed is 60 MPH.

 

Brooklin Boat Yard did the latest restoration. Prior restorations/upkeep/maintenance and a repower was done at Mayea Boat Works and on the St. Lawrence River at the Antique Boat Museum. She was built in this same area of the 1,000 Islands as the Antique Boat Museum is located in at Hutchinson Boat Works or http://www.hbwboats.com/.

 

Built in 1948, she has had several owners. The last owners donated her to the museum years ago. Google search “ Pardon Me” or “World’s Largest Runabout”  or read pages 76-77 of Robert Speltz’s book The Real Runabouts from 1977. Seabuddy has a signed copy of his book dated 1980. Mr. Speltz has now passed on.

 

Hutchinson  Boat Works or Hutchinson Brothers built boats along the St. Lawrence River since about 1908. The business continued under new leadership after the brothers passed on. They now sell boats, but they were a wooden boat builder originally. They also offered wood boat repairs in oak, mahogany, cedar, and teak.  While they could build and repair all styles of wood construction, most of their boats were lapstrake style or “clinker style”, like a Lyman boat. Pardon Me is not a lapstrake design. She has the double planked mahogany construction method.

 

Pardon Me was designed by Hacker and built by Hutchinson for Mr. Locke of Oak Island in the Chippewa Bay area of the 1,000 Islands (summer home) and MI (his winter home). She did not handle well and never has been used much in her history. Her sheer size, transmission shifting, handling around a pier, engine cooling, and her massive engine torque were some of the reasons for this lack of use. Call it fine-tuning, trouble shooting, or tinkering, problems have continued over her history since 1948.

 

She is now back at the Antique Boat Museum in the Thousand Islands for the upcoming summer months.

88u

Keeping a cold one, cold

boat cup cooler

Seabuddy photo showing bottle, trim ring, and underside

 

Just introduced, your boat’s drink cup holders will chill your drinks.

Ask for Dometics’ new Cup Cooler from your boat builder, marina, or ship’s store to get the new one.

“The Cup Cooler makes your last sip even colder than your first. It allows boaters to keep a can, bottle or any appropriately sized beverage container chilled on even the hottest days, something that a typical cup holder or can koozie can’t begin to accomplish,” said Ned Trigg, Sr. VP of Global System Sales at Dometic Marine. “A soda or beer may be cold enough when you pull it out of the ice chest, but from that moment on, it starts warming up. Now, for the first time in the history of boating, your beverage will actually get colder as you drink it.”

Cans of soda, beer, and many bottles fit and are in contact with the electrically chilled sides of the Cup Cooler, which further chills your drink with its cooling element as you skipper your boat, friends fish, or the kids lounge in the sun. The angled bottom shape insert allows it to work, outstandingly, with many shapes.

It is designed to fit different thicknesses helm areas and decks and wires into your choice of an accessory switch or you can run several into one switch. Domestic has provided a drain each cup holder and it is cleaned, polished 316 stainless steel trim ring and a similar easy-clean aluminum interior. It is also lighted inside.

Here is a minute-long video on the Dometic Cup Cooler, please visit http://youtu.be/DpYZ5tBOqUc.

Some of these photos are from me (Seabuddy), from where I saw it for the first time in early fall, and then Dometic’s photos. Mine is the least pretty one.

 

Cup Cooler dometic

as installed at your helm, Dometic photo

 

marine and RV cup cooler dometic

four in a row, Dometic photo

Chris craft center console Catalina 34 coming

triple engined outboard center console

rendering

Chris Craft joins the triple engine center console choices in an upscale, “Mega Yacht” type tender style, rather than as a pure fish boat. She is offered with 900 Horsepower in triple outboard engines with joy stick controls from either Mercury Marine or Yamaha. Expect the boat to be introduced 10.30.2014 as a 2015 boat model. Specs will be 34’ with a beam of 10’ 10” with a 21 degree deep vee bottom. The beam allows for a double sun lounger with arm rests, triple helm chairs, and a L-shaped bench across the transom that allows walk-thur access to the swim platform without removing seating cushions. A Glass Cockpit style of engine and electronic controls all displayed in two big, side by side 15” screens will be the way to go at the helm station.

A special optional feature is the “summer kitchen” with grill, inverter, refrigerator / freezer, sink and storage areas. What a way to entertain on the water! This should prove to be popular.

Note that Chris Smith built his first boat ( for hunting ducks) around 1874 at the age of 13 in Michigan. Speedboats/runabouts, and racers soon came along after that. By 1927 Chris Craft was the largest maker of wooden mahogany boats. Chris’ son, Jay, took over before W. W. II and did an outstanding job of running the family business. During the war, they build 10,000 small boats for the war effort. 1959 saw Chris Craft with 5,000 employees in over 10 plants. Hansen then took the reins and made the cover of Time magazine.

After World War II, Chris-Craft recommenced commercial boat production with renewed vigor. By 1959, Chris-Craft had 10 factories and more than 5,000 employees. Leadership of the company passed to Chris Smith‚Äôs grandson, Harsen. When interviewed by Time magazine, he attributed Chris-Craft’s success to the family rather than any individual within it.

After some hard times under various owners, Chris Craft has now had steady ownership and good management.

chris craft center console 34 fiberglass triple engined outboard

One of several top choices