Posts Tagged ‘boat festival’

Want a bargin?

Century Boats Resorter 20’

Peter brought his self-restored Classic wood boat Century boat Resorter up from Fl and took two top awards at the recent Chesapeake Bay Chapter – ACBS 11 acre Boat festival in St. Michaels, MD.

His Resorter is powered with a gas Norberg engine. This is a rare combination, as the Cal Connell “Crusader” Cadillac 331 cu. in. engine was coming to market via Century Boats in both Coronado and Resorter Century Boat models and it was a lighter weight engine so it delivered speeds of 60 mph in a prototype Resorter (these Cal Connell modified  gas Cadillac engines powered similar cut- down family boat designs to over 67 mph in race conditions).

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Two Bedrooms and one bath condo; that goes forever at 7 mph, or about 175 miles at 17 mph

Your choice;Chairs or a settee for seating in the main salon

Are these full tank of diesel fuel ranges hard and fast? No. Could one reasonably expect such performance numbers to better understand if this yacht is for you? Yes.

Mainship Yachts kept the same hull as their 34, added on a few inches in the bow pulpit to make for a longer LOA, pushed some things around to get in a nice second stateroom inside and it’s the new and very nicely appointed 2011 model year Mainship Trawler 35.

Never get to stuck on the numbers here with this “35” yacht has an LOA of 39’ 5”, a beam of 14’ 2”,  a somewhat light weight of 20,000 lbs.  Single diesel (or two), bow and stern thrusters (or not, with the twin diesel engines), and flying bridge seating for five plus a bar-b-que and sink, etc make for a tippy motion at sea, but a fine spot to relax after a days run once you are on the hook.

master stateroom at the bow

The 34 had just one stateroom, sold well, and I predict that this one, with the two private stateroom will set sales records. Price…about $300 to $400 thousand depending on how one finishes this yacht out.

Oh, BTW, if you like slow and great fuel economy, get the smallest engine they offer. She will cruise slow on less than 150 Hp, the rest of the power is for “beat ahead of a storm” or a “good purchase against a running tide”, etc. The thrusters will take care of any marina  handling issues.

Main salon looking foward, look for the galley cook top

underway

Riva modern wood and glass real Runabout from Riva Yachts

layout cutaway for the Riva runabout

looking down

She goes as fast as the mid-40s with her twin diesels all the way wide open. At almost 6 tons she is a BIG wood and glass runabout. And, with her beam at 9’ 2” she needs a permit to haul her around on land.

Watch the ride when it gets rough, her deadrise is only a moderate v hull shape.

Made in Italy and sold mostly at Marine Max boat dealers. Yes, they usually have one Riva runabout boat for sale.

at speed

Riva yacht class

Wood and glass make for a nice day boat yacht

the skipper and the admiral

Boaters Coffee Shop in St. Michaels, Maryland

Its all of the White House

First, do not miss out on the brownies.

That said, this one is good coffee and right up the street from the biggest marina in town. Short walk from your boat slip. Go to St. Michaels Talbot Street., turn left, it is on the far side from you of the Talbot street. (the main street for St. Michaels). Across from Ava’s lunch, dinner, pizza, win bar, with its the lively social, friendly atmosphere of the town of St. Michaels.

Coming by land to St. Michaels?  On the driver’s side of the Talbot Street as one comes into downtown. 402 South Talbot Street.

There is a front sitting room and a huge back setting room with nice art, comfy couches, chairs, and an opportunity to get off the boat and plan your exploration of the Town of St. Michaels.

Coffee? Yup, just like all the other places. It tastes right to seabuddy / chris brown.

Why here? 1)  Close to the marina. 2) The spacious and relaxing area to rest and savor your drink. 3) the friendly  and helpful staff 4) did seabuddy say something about the brownies? 5) Wi Fi is free.

St.  Michaels Perk Coffee House, 402 Talbot Street, 410-745-8099, tell them seabuddy recommended them to you.

Amusement Park Wood Runabout Ride Boat

real wood, real varnish finish

outboard motor mounted inboard, inside the fordeck

note the yellow tinted stripesbetween planks

she is all of 8 feet long

Fact sheet

She is a real planked mahogany runabout in miniature. An outboard motor mounted inside the hull provides her power. She has single planked hull sides and bottom. Made in a small run back in 1931, she let the kids ride in a mahogany wood runabout just likeDad’s.  Only eight feet long, she got the “look” down very well for a reduced sized craft.

Dads and antique and classic boats just go together, is seabuddy / chris brown’s observation.

17’ Grady White Wood boat 1967

Nice "after" restoration Photo

She won an award in a Antique and Classic Boat Festival in St. Michaels, MD. For the restoration of what would be called a “bone yard” boat that most would just cut up, rather than save, rebuild, restore, and give another boating life to.

New structural wood was mixed in with the still good wood. She got careful time and attention to all the “next” steps. Note the finish on the stained /varnished wood and the painted hull sides. Wooden Boat Restoration is noted along the eastern half of the US for their ability to deliver any level of finish that one wants for a wood boat.

Their secret?  Years of knowledge, study, and a paint booth that Chip Foose of automotive TV fame would die for.

the Interior is highly varnished to furniture grade finish

Note that Helene Breza, woodwright, (pictured) was very involved in this boat.

Pride in her work

Wooden Boat Restoration is a small, hands on, firm that does very nice work in a large shop in the eastern shore of Maryland. Need something done? Give them a call. Shop 410-928-5501, cell 610-247-8053 or on the web…

www.woodenboatrestorationllc.com

These photos are from that website and other Wooden Boat Restoration projects are shown there also. George likes his customers to get progress photos of their wood boat as work is done on it.

"before" the restoration photo

"before the wood boat restoration

"during" wood boat restoration

Modern power comes to a Wood yacht

Master stateroom, note the light with a wood interior finish

This boat has the latest joy stick handling choice and the efficient Volvo Penta IPS pod drive system. With smaller than normal engines for good fuel economy, she makes her speed with the IPS pod drive as a straight shaft inboard of higher Hp would.

So, its… 1) easy marina maneuvering, 2) same cruising and top speeds, and 3) better fuel economy underway comes with this top-of-the-line Yacht. And the IPS diesels and drives take up less space within the hull, so another room is added, to top off the benefits of an Volvo Penta IPS drive system.

wide side decks plus this saloon

How about the hull? She is wood and resin instead of glassfiber and resin. In this case, epoxy resin. A fiberglass boat is made up of layers of glassfiber cloth combined with resin, this one is made up of wood combined with epoxy resin. Epoxy resin is both expensive and extra strong. On a budget-be-damned yacht, where strength and light weight are valued higher than the budget, epoxy is the resin of choice. Epoxy resin is used in either wood or glass fiber yacht construction.

The interior is also finished in wood, often in either a gloss white paint finish, or stained and finished with rubbed-effect varnish.

This hull splits the sea

She has three staterooms, one with a head in suite, plus a shared head for the other four people in the remaining two staterooms. Its a galley down, with and inside steering in the main saloon set-up. LOA 59’ 6”, Beam 16’ 7”, Price, just over 2 million. She is listed as a boat for sale / yacht for sale on Boat Trader.

at speed at sea

Here are three new Ones to repeat and learn for Boating

Slip, Slop, Slap… say it fast, and repeat it a few times to yourself.

Slip…on a shirt

Slop…on sunscreen

Slap…a hat on your head.

The sun is brutal on your skin while using you boat.

It is amazing what seabuddy / chris brown learns from tuning in, Dave Hanson, Host of the “WNAV Boat Show” at 2:00 pm on WNAV, 1430 radio out of Annapolis, MD

Riva Florida runabouts and Riva Super Florida runabout boats

riding bow high for the best control

Riva built this luxury runabout in Lake Como, Italy in wood and plywood from 1953 to 1968. The factory records indicate that 711 runabouts were made over this time frame.

A Super Florida Riva is a longer hull with 2” more beam than a Florida Riva model.  The hull was made bigger along with the new name to perform and ride better with a more powerful V-8 engine that became available as time progressed from the 1953 beginning of boat production.

These runabout boats all had a deeper forefoot than the typical Chris Craft of that time, while at the transom, the bottom was all but flat, as was the Chris Craft runabout.

This gives a better riding across the water experience at low speeds but these Riva need to get that sharp vee in the bow area out of the part of the hull that is in contact with the water as any speed increases. Why? What steers a boat should be the rudder. If a wave or wake at an angle catches the vee up front, that area can become a larger “rudder” than the boat’s metal rudder and the runabout will “bow steer” and the helmsman can not correct or over-come this redirection by the smaller area metal rudder that is attached to the steering wheel.

This vee forward is deeper than a Chris Craft

almost flat bottom at the stern

How to do prevent this action? Simple, balance and power the runabout such that the vee splits the waves and wakes at low speeds and weight balance, adjust the shaft down angle, and power to make the boat ride bow proud, or bow high, at speed. Without a power trim in a fixed shaft inboard, these three items are very important.

What happens as power causes the speed to go up? One must change one or all of these three design goals to work at the new, higher speed.

Over-power a straight shaft inboard and the flat transom stern area give more lift to the transom area of the runabout. Lift the transom and the bow gets pushed down at the same time. The lift of one pushes down the angle of the other.

The down angle of the inboard’s shaft also provides lift to the back of the boat. More lift from the almost flat bottom stern and down angle of the shaft causes the runabout bow to want to submarine and bow steer.

The fix?

1)      Change one or all of the three things to work together at the new speed to make for a safe riding / handling boat again.

2)      Have power trim on the drive to allow the helmsman to adjust amount of lift at the stern area of the boat. That is why I/Os (sterndrives) have power trim and that feature makes them more complicated.

What does this all mean? The runabout was set-up to perform well for an expected top speed: put in a souped up engine and that set-up will not perform well at the new top speed.

A good side view of how the vee goes to flat as the hull bottom moves aft